teenagers

As our children become teenagers, we start to glimpse the kind of people they will be as grown-ups. We may see their work ethic develop, or watch as they take a principled stance at school. We might also catch them bullying, cheating, or lying. 

Some of us look back on our teenage years with fondness as we recall the freedom, friends, and fun we had. A sense of nostalgia might have us smiling about a simpler time, but sometimes we forget the pressures that go along with being young.

Adults get to declare their choices for local government elected officials on October 20. Although young people cannot yet participate in this democratic opportunity, it’s a perfect time to think and talk together about leadership. 

Young people value play, discovery, and connection – those are the things that are important to all of us when we are little. Do you remember how easy it was to laugh and make friends when you were a kid?

Your teenager may pull away from family time, he may spend evenings on his phone in a private bubble, or she might start hanging out with people that you find questionable. How are we supposed to support and guide our teens when they resist our presence?
 

Teenagers are still assembling a picture of the universe and they need our support. How can you be close with your teen who is building their independence? I will explain some options using a lens of equality to give examples.