children

Who is a Fernie Mountain Mama? She is the woman next to you in line at the grocery store. She is your next-door neighbour. She is the girl who hitchhiked west or drove north or cycled east and found her forever-home in the Kootenays.

Do you know an educator in the Columbia Basin who encourages environmental stewardship and sustainability? The Columbia Basin Environmental Education Network (CBEEN) has opened nominations for the 2019 Environmental Education Awards of Excellence.

As our children become teenagers, we start to glimpse the kind of people they will be as grown-ups. We may see their work ethic develop, or watch as they take a principled stance at school. We might also catch them bullying, cheating, or lying. 

Children need to find their own voice. This can be in terms of the choice of their own style in clothing, their favourite foods or in the way they like to move. Every child likes finding their own way of doing things, but it sometimes takes a while for them to do so. That being said, there a few ways that you can help your child in finding their own “movement voice.”

With patches of snow on the ground, it’s a day for jackets and hoods up to protect ears from the cold.

Life with young people is rarely calm. From wake up until bedtime, children of all ages require attention and energy from their grown up caregivers. Although parents of teenagers have a little more freedom, the mental demands remain substantial.

This school year, over 5,000 K-12 students in the Columbia Basin will venture beyond the walls of their classroom, where they will deepen their knowledge of the natural world with help from local mentors as part of the Columbia Basin Environmental Education Network’s (CBEEN) Wild Voices program.

Event Date: 
Thursday, September 27, 2018
Time: 
6:00pm - 10:00pm

It's that time of year again... Grow's CUSTOMER APPRECIATION EVENING! 

Nibbles, drinks and, of course, lots of great deals. More details to follow!

'Back to school' is emotionally loaded for many of us. As a phrase, those three words can represent many different feelings all tangled together. 

Your teenager may pull away from family time, he may spend evenings on his phone in a private bubble, or she might start hanging out with people that you find questionable. How are we supposed to support and guide our teens when they resist our presence?