Feature Artist

Hello, I'm Adam Rigby, owner/operator of Rigby Sign. I have been operating in Fernie for the last five or six years.

Liam Monahan

I was always into art as a kid and wanted to be a tattoo artist when I grew up. I started spray painting when I was about 12 years old, at first illegally on walls and trains around the town I grew up in Ocean Grove Victoria, Australia until I was approached by the city council. They decided to employ a team of artists to spray giant murals on walls around the city to brighten up the town and put a stop to graffiti. As we were respected artists the walls stayed untouched.

It’s not very often you have a job that you look forward to every day and can also take with you all over the world.

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I guess my journey into cake decorating began from a desire to make my friend’s birthdays special by baking them a cake. I couldn’t remember the last time I had received one for my birthday and the memory of such a gift inspired me to reintroduce this custom amongst my friends. At first I was making fairly straight forward cakes and decorating them with fancy writing or candy, but after a while, I started to get more excited by the challenge of more difficult 3D designs.

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It was midnight mass on Christmas Eve. The church was dark and silent, full to the rim with people in the historic Fernie Catholic Church. The sound of an angel singing “Oh Holy Night” seemed to come from heaven itself as shivers raised on the arms or those in attendance, and tears sprung to their eyes.

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The Fernie Writers’ Conference is back this July and with it a new schedule and array of exciting instructors and courses. One of these instructors is acclaimed Canadian singer/songwriter Mae Moore, teaching a course on songwriting, the first time a course of this nature has been included in the Conference’s lineup.

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For me, photography is something that has just kind of happened. Sure, I used to flip through old National Geographic magazines and think how cool it would be to take the photos I saw, or wonder how I could get into Powder Magazine, but that was because I wanted to be a professional skier; I never really thought of being a professional photographer.

It all began when a neighbour, Sean, asked if he could store his wire fed welder in my shop. He noticed I had a 220 Volt power required to run it and in return I could play around with it in my spare time. I had never welded let alone worked with a wire fed rig before and actually dropped out of welding in High School so I was stoked to see what I could do with it. I knew very little about welding but figured it was an adult version of cutting and pasting, just slightly more dangerous.

Every band remembers their first gig. Most bands park their van in a dingy back alley, unload their instruments through the back door of a local bar, do a sound check, and nervously get through a well rehearsed set for very little money. For our first gig, we unloaded our instruments onto a chairlift and played 6,316 feet above sea level. It was at the top of Fernie Alpine Resort on the outside deck of the Lost Boys Café playing for skiers on their lunch break. There was no sound guy, a blizzard blew in halfway through our set, we played for free sandwiches, and we were stoked.

Matty Westcott