Outdoors

Just because most of the traditional summer holiday fly fishing anglers, who ascend on Fernie every year to fish the world renowned blue ribbon Elk River and tributaries, have gone home, it doesn't mean that the fly fishing season is over. Far from it, as those in the know will contest, fall can provide some of the best fishing of the year.

Once you are able to consistently hit good shots, the next step to improving your game is learning to control your ball flight. This means hitting fades, draws, or knock down shots. During a round of golf you may find yourself in a situation where you need to either curve the ball or hit it low to avoid hitting trees or other obstacles. Here are some tips to help you get out of these situations.

1) LEARN TO FADE OR SLICE THE BALL

Brilliant sapphire blue sky. Yellow leaves drift to the forest floor and crunch underfoot. Fluffy seeds float through the air. Birds and insects are silent. Cool crisp mornings precede hot, dry afternoons. Fall is the season for change; not only preparing for winter, but preparing for life.

Unfortunately, glorious memories of nature’s autumn display mingle with great angst and panic of the coming school year. Nearly a half century later I can reflect back on those gut wrenching emotions and understand why I was so troubled by September.

This column began a few months ago in an effort to uncover individuals in Fernie that manage work, families, social lives, and a training regime. Not having kids of my own but trying to manage a business, friends, family and training… “just for fun” I was curious how these individuals squeezed it all in. If anything it’s been disconcerting – wake up earlier, go to bed later, break up training rides and runs, tag team parents, nutrition, hydration, cross training… so far from a simple formula that can be applied to anyone!

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Photo by Dave Brown & Fernie Fly Fishing

The weather has been cool and wet but the fishing has been hot on dry flies. The Elk has been on fire.

Through July, as a general rule, Stoneflies were coming off in big numbers earlier in the day, with massive Mayfly hatches in the afternoon followed by Caddis hatches in the early evening. That's not unusual, but the Mayfly hatches were exceptional.

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Lee-Anne and family floating the Elk River

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The rivers opened on June 15 after being closed since April 1 to protect the spawning season for wild Westslope Cutthroat Trout, for which the Elk Valley is famous. July is the month that fly anglers from all over the globe start to descend on Fernie to enjoy a truly unique and incredible dry fly fishery. The rivers streams and lakes around Fernie provide fly fishing opportunities that are simply as good as it gets.