Art and Entertainment

As soon as I finished The Little Shadows by Marina Endicott, I knew I had to write about it. It’s the kind of novel that not only bears up under multiple readings but rewards them, the kind of book that grabs hold of readers, pulling them into a fully realized world that lingers with them long after the last page. Endicott has recreated the milieu of early twentieth century vaudeville in such vibrant detail that, for the space of 530 pages, readers live there. Best of all, Endicott manages to celebrate the lives of these artists without romanticizing them.

I’ve always had a thing for visual art like web design, photography, painting and sculpting but the world of creating something out of fabric and wearing it is the ultimate for me. Two years ago I decided to turn my passion into a business – A La Maude Design. But it really began when I was 14 years old attending high school in a small French town in Northern Québec. I wasn't popular, far from it actually and used to express myself through clothing, making new clothes out of old clothes using only needle and thread. I was even given a prize for “original style” at my grad ceremony.

Morphine was the kind of band whose music spanned across time. During its tenure throughout the ‘90s, when bands across North America were imitating the Seattle sound of Nirvana, Pearl Jam and Alice in Chains, Morphine’s self-described “low rock” emerged as a real alternative. Morphine was a rock band without a guitar. But to hear frontman Mark Sandman talk or perform on his two-string slide bass, it would be easy to place Morphine back a couple of generations. Sandman seemed as though he would have been right at home hanging out with Jack Kerouac and Allen Ginsberg.

March 6: Marilyn Monroe’s last movie was released over 50 years ago, so the timing is probably perfect to tackle such an icon in film. Her image still epitomizes the Hollywood dream, but many of us have never actually seen her act. Nonetheless, it’s quite the task to capture her ineffable ability to be sexy and sweet, savvy and susceptible all in one breathy sentence. My Week With Marilyn comes pretty close, while at the same time letting the audience into the strange world of ‘50s-style superstardom.

Workbook is an aphrodisiac. Better than raw oysters.

Hollywood has never been kind to the colonized peoples of the Middle East (Arabs, Persians or Kurds). They have been portrayed as sexual predators (a stereotype most famously portrayed by silent film era heart-throb Rudolph Valentino in the 1921 film The Sheikh), terrorists (True Lies, The Siege, Rules of Engagement, Executive Decision, The Kingdom) and authoritarian parents (Towelhead, Babel).

A CARDA dog, ready to work.
Photo by Todd Weselake
www.RavenEyePhotography.com

Ladies, meet longtime Fernie local photographer Todd Weselake. He's single, comes with excellent cooking skills, and his own snowmobile...
Photo by Martina Halik
www.RavenEyePhotography.com

February 7: Loveable stoners Harold and Kumar are back, celebrating Christmas more than a month behind schedule. A Very Harold & Kumar Christmas revisits what made their trip to White Castle an underground classic. The equation looks a little like this: Harold + Kumar + weed + mission = mission impossible. The film re-enters the pair’s life with Harold off the weed, on Wall Street and estranged from Kumar, who is keeping the home “fires” burning. When a parcel for Harold arrives at their old pad, Kumar decides to deliver it in person.

On February 6 Valerie Compton and Rosemary Nixon will be speaking at the Fernie Heritage Library about their recently released books: acclaimed novels that also work as emotionally heightened meditations on motherhood and loss.

Growing up in Fernie I have always been surrounded by action sports and with the nature of the town freestyle skiing and free ride mountain biking caught my eye immediately. My friends and I conveniently grew up in an age of radical progression in both sports, the twin tip ski was being perfected and dirt jump mountain biking was just around the corner. It was the perfect time for any upcoming artist, not only to learn the tricks of the trade but also to grow with the industry as it evolved into what it is today.