Art and Entertainment

Patterns hold a seductive beauty in both their production and consumption. We surround ourselves with repeating patterns in our dwellings and on our clothes; speak of patterns of weather, behaviour, and thought; and often conceive of the sacred and its affiliated institutions through infinite patterns.

The seemingly endless energy of young children to both create and destroy throughout their day can make the clean up crew (parents) a little less than inspired. July’s art project, Colour Clusters, has two simple parts.

July is a month of incredible potential and as potential energy builds to transform into forward momentum, this transformation has been building for a long time.

Caller ID has been around for years. Most of us have it on our phones. We use it to decide if we need to answer that ring. It’s especially handy at letting us know when we don’t need to answer. But caller ID is being weaponized to get you to answer even when you don’t want to.

Over the next few months, I will make art supply suggestions that I have loved using with children. This month’s art item is the small but mighty pipette. I bought mine at our local IGS.

The Fernie and District Arts Council has been awarded a Public Art Grant by the Columbia Basin Trust to add to the public art inventory of Fernie. The project will be to select and install a permanent mural in Fernie.

Freedom is everything. This month Sadie wrote with the ancestors. She took the freedom to dig into the past and find the history that made us free, at least in this country anyway.

Join us in these pages over the next four months as we look more closely at some of the ongoing projects.

The movie focuses on the adventures of Veers, an alien super soldier and amnesiac who, after being captured by her enemies, escaping, and crash landing on earth, begins a quest to figure out who she is while fighting for truth and justice at the same time. 

Legend has it that after producing the breakthrough hit album The Joshua Tree for Irish rockers U2, Daniel Lanoise purchased a mansion in LA and instead of filling it with furniture and art, he left it sparsely decorated—almost ascetic.